Studies have shown that the encryption hijacking behavior for consumers is "essentially extinct"

Studies have shown that the encryption hijacking behavior for consumers is "essentially extinct"

Internet security company MalwareBytes said in a report released on April 23 that illegal cryptocurrency mining (or encryption hijacking) targeting consumers is "essentially extinct."

According to the report, after the mining service CoinHive in the browser was closed in early March (when the team claimed that the project was not economically viable), the encryption hijacking for consumers has been greatly reduced. At the same time, the number of such attacks against businesses has increased from the previous quarter.

In addition, MalwareBytes also pointed out that in the first quarter of this year, bitcoin (BTC) holders using the Electrum wallet on Mac computers lost stolen bitcoin worth more than $2.3 million, which was stolen by a Trojan version of the wallet. It is.

Encrypted hijacking is the use of computing devices to mine cryptocurrencies without the knowledge of the device owner. Common effects experienced by users are slowdown, more heat generation and shorter battery life. It can be said that because of the ability to mine on lower-level hardware, the cryptocurrency that appears to be the preferred type of attack is privacy-centric monero (XMR).

As Cointelegraph reported last May, a researcher claimed to have discovered Coinhive encrypted mining scripts on more than 300 government and university websites around the world.

Earlier this week, US network security company Symantec found a surge in the number of new cryptocurrency malicious mining software targeted at businesses.

Source: Bitcoin House