Ripple co-founder confirmed to be infected with new coronary pneumonia and is now fully recovered

Ripple co-founder and former CEO Chris Larsen had been infected with the new coronavirus earlier and has now fully recovered.

Larsen, who recently turned 60, announced his recovery on Twitter and called on the cured patients to "consider donating blood to help with antibody transplants." He also took this opportunity to thank those working on the front line and shared a photo of his blood donation.

Ripple co-founder confirmed to be infected with new coronary pneumonia and is now fully recovered

People who have been infected with the new coronavirus and have recovered will produce antibodies to provide immunity to the virus. This means that they can help eliminate the virus or inactivate it when it encounters the virus again. Hospitals around the world have begun to draw blood from immunized donors and provide it to appropriate recipients to help high-risk patients beat the virus faster.

Larsen had not disclosed the fact that he had the new coronavirus. When he posted a picture of his thumbs up wearing a mask on Twitter, most members of the crypto community knew about it.

Ripple co-founder confirmed to be infected with new coronary pneumonia and is now fully recovered

After co-founding Ripple with Jed McCaleb in 2012, Chris Larsen served as the CEO of the technology company until 2016, after which he transferred the position to the then Chief Operating Officer Brad Garlinghouse.

After the cryptocurrency bull market at the end of 2017, some people thought that the Ripple shares held by Larsen might push him to the position of the world's richest man. Larsen is still involved in the work of Ripple and is currently the executive chairman of the board of directors, but he now spends most of his time on charity.

Although it has been effectively controlled in China, the number of new coronavirus infections has exceeded 1 million worldwide. The current death toll has reached nearly 70,000, which is the most serious epidemic since the H1N1 flu in 2009.

Last week, the United States became the country most severely infected by coronavirus, with almost a quarter of cases from the United States.